Skip to main content
Previous sectionNext section

$ZDASCII

Converts an eight-byte string to a $DOUBLE floating point number.

Synopsis

$ZDASCII(string,position)
$ZDA(string,position)

Parameters

Argument Description
string A string or number. It can be a value, a variable, or an expression. It must be a minimum of eight bytes in length. A number is converted to canonical form by removing a leading plus sign, and leading and trailing zeros before it is supplied to $ZDASCII; the resulting canonical number must be a minimum of eight bytes in length.
position Optional — A starting position in the string, expressed as a positive, non-zero integer. The default is 1. Position is counted in single bytes, not eight-byte strings. There must exist at least eight bytes of string from the specified position (inclusive). A numeric position value is parsed as an integer by truncating decimal digits, removing leading zeros and plus signs, etc.

Description

The value that $ZDASCII returns depends on the parameters you use.

  • $ZDASCII(string) returns a $DOUBLE (IEEE floating point) numeric interpretation of an eight-byte string starting at the first character position of string.

  • $ZDASCII(string,position) returns a $DOUBLE (IEEE floating point) numeric interpretation of an eight-byte string beginning at the starting byte position specified by position.

$ZDASCII can return either a positive or a negative number.

$ZDASCII issues a <FUNCTION> error if string is less than eight bytes in length, if the specified position results in a remaining string of less than eight bytes, or if position is an invalid value.

Examples

The following example determines the numeric interpretation of the numeric 12345678:

  WRITE $ZDASCII(12345678)
Copy code to clipboard

It returns: .000000000000000000000000000000000000068213200517013251261

The following examples also return the same value:

  WRITE !,$ZDASCII("12345678",1)
  WRITE !,$ZDASCII(++001234567899,1)
  WRITE !,$ZDASCII("++001234567899",5)
Copy code to clipboard

The following example determines the numeric interpretation of the negative numeric –1234567. Note that the minus sign is counted as a byte:

  WRITE $ZDASCII(-1234567)
Copy code to clipboard

It returns: .00000000000000000000000000000000000000000099583343788967399388

The following example determines the numeric interpretation of the character string “abcdefgh”:

  WRITE $ZDASCII("abcdefgh")
Copy code to clipboard

It returns: 85408832230361244356000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000

Notes

$ZDASCII and Other $ASCII Functions

$ZDASCII converts a eight byte (64-bit) character string to an IEEE floating point number. $ZQASCII converts a eight byte (64-bit) character string to an integer. To convert an 8-bit byte string to an integer use $ASCII. To convert a 16-bit (wide) character string to an integer use $ZWASCII. To convert a 32-bit (long) character string to an integer use $ZLASCII.

See Also